Publicat pe 06/03/2020

Brussels, March 5th, 2020: The European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) has appointed Mr. Mihai Ivașcu, Advisor to the President of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Romania (CCIR), Rapporteur for the EESC Budget for 2021, thus becoming the first Romanian to whom is entrusted such responsibility. The budgetary procedure for the 2021 budget of the Committee has already begun and shall be completed in October, this year.

In his new capacity, Mr. Mihai Ivașcu had a first meeting with Mr. Johannes Hahn – European Commissioner for Budget and Administration, along with Mrs. Milena Angelova – Vice-President for Budget of the EESC, in which the perspectives and projects of the European Economic and Social Committee were presented. At the same time, discussions were held on the negotiations on the multiannual financial framework (MFF) – The Budget of the European Union for the years 2021-2027.

The Advisor to the President of CCIR, Mr. Mihai Ivașcu – Rapporteur for the EESC Budget 2021 – said: “Compared to previous negotiations on the multiannual financial framework, we are already late. Europe has an ambitious agenda that needs to be backed by a solid and robust budget. We need a common, fast and ambitious solution for the Union budget, in the best interest of all European citizens.

I was extremely impressed by the determination of the European Commissioner for Budget and Administration, Mr. Johannes Hahn, to reach an agreement as quickly as possible on the MFF 2021-2027. All stakeholders involved have a special responsibility in this extremely busy period, with many problems on the European Union agenda, many of them unexpected”.

Background

The European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) is an EU advisory body comprising representatives of workers’ and employers’ organisations and other interest groups. It issues opinions on EU issues to the European Commission, the Council of the EU and the European Parliament, thus acting as a bridge between the EU’s decision-making institutions and EU citizens.

The multiannual financial framework (MFF) represents the EU’s long-term budget. It sets EU spending limits as a whole, but also for different areas of activity. EU annual budgets must always be set within the limits of the Multiannual Financial Framework. The MFF should be adopted for at least 5 years, but the recent custom was the adoption for a period of 7 years.